Spooky stickers and strange superstitions

Spooky stickers and strange superstitions: Halloween Spooktacular

Did you know that it’s thought unlucky for a bride to see a snake on the way to her wedding? To celebrate Halloween we’re delving into the strangest and spookiest superstitions from across the nation. Read on to find out about black cats, snakes, and our other Halloween favourites and the weird and wonderful traditions around them. 

1. Although it is lucky for a black cat to cross your path, it is considered unlucky to open a door to a black cat. Black cats also used to be frequently taken on board ships to bring good luck to the voyage. 

2. If a cat sneezes it is a sign of rain. If it puts on skis it is a sure sign of snow! 

3. Apparently an effective method of staying young is to eat a snake (not recommended). And if you wear a snake skin on your head you will never have a headache. 

4. Spiders feature in a number of superstitions. Spider webs have been used to heal cuts since the time of the Ancient Romans. Interestingly there is still much discussion around using spider’s webs in modern medicine due to their wound healing properties. It’s also believed to be lucky if a small spider lands on you, and means that money or good fortune is coming your way.

 

5. Once it starts growing you should never point at a pumpkin as this will cause it to rot. 

All of these spooky characters, plus a few more besides, can be found on our Happy Halloween sticker sets. Featuring 70 stickers in total, they’re the perfect way to reward ghoulishly good effort and achievement this Halloween season. Plus they’re ideal for special Halloween quizzes and half-term activities. 

Grab your broom and head over to our Halloween sticker selection to fill your cauldron and reward your little monsters. Plus don’t forget that every purchase you make earns you points through our loyalty reward scheme. You can find out more here and start building extra rewards now! 

Facts courtesy of ‘The Encyclopaedia of Superstitions‘ by E. and M. A. Radford

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